How to Become a Fire Fighter in Georgia: What You Have to Do to Get a Job as a Firefighter

Some cities and municipalities hire new fire fighters every two years or so to refill positions made vacant by retirements and other reasons.

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Regardless of prior experience and/or training, it is important to follow the basic requirements in order to qualify to become a fire fighter in Georgia.

The following criteria is what you have to do to get a job as a fire fighter in Georgia:

I. Apply. Go online or call the fire department's non-emergency number in your community and request an application.

II. Upon hiring, you'll be sent to "Rookie School," otherwise known as the Fire Academy where you will learn how to put out fires, respect fires and extricate people among other things.

How to become a fire fighter in Georgia What to expect at Rookie School

The academy is typically held in a small town south of Atlanta, called Forsyth, Georgia. This school also has the Georgia Peace Officers Training Facility on the same campus.

The training is a five-day, ten-hour per day training with homework to be completed at home at night.

The first order of the day upon arrival each morning to the academy is P.T., or physical training.

"Once you have met the above criteria, you will need to attend the Georgia Public Safety Training Centers Basic Training Program.

The training program consists of some of the following coursework:

      • Firefighter History and Orientation

 

      • Firefighter Safety and Health

 

      • Building Construction

 

      • Forcible Entry

 

      • Ground Ladders

 

      • Ventilation Areas

 

      • Hazmat handling and awareness

 

      • Live Fire Training

 

      • (Resourced here)

Third, how to become a fire fighter in Georgia is to get certified as an EMT, or emergency medical technician.

It has been estimated that approximately 80 percent of all fire calls in America are of a rescue or non-fire related purpose.

Therefore, it's important that all those on the trucks are board-certified EMT's or paramedics as they are oftentimes first to respond to a life-threatening emergency.

Upon completion of that school, the chief of the fire department will access the need of the individual fire houses to ascertain where a new recruit will be assigned.

Upon assignment, the recruit will be certified in various skill levels on the truck in order to be better used in most of the fire calls.

For example, the main areas of training will be in swift water rescue, extrication, trench rescue and other vital areas.

The only pre-certification that rookie candidates have to become a fire fighter in Georgia would be CPR, cardio pulmonary resuscitation certification.

Basic or Paramedic training, typically taught in many technical colleges around the state are an asset, as is being bi-lingual.

In Georgia, the second most-spoken language is Spanish and the third is Sign Language.

Although some of these prerequisites don't often guarantee an assignment, they do provide points in your favor when you are trying to become a fire fighter in Georgia.

How to become a fire fighter in Georgia: To Protect and to Serve

"Being prepared isn't a slogan or a catch phrase, but rather a necessary part of our jobs as firefighters

and it is something that we owe to the community we serve and protect every day. You never know

when a simple assist run will call upon the lesser used skills in your tool kit" (Source)

Another helpful attitude for those who of you have to do to get a job as a firefighter is to have a servant heart.

You, as a firefighter, are a "public servant and it's important to know that you're willing to go into harm's way when people are running out.

So, to learn how to become a fire fighter in Georgia , you have to do these things and do them as a team player.

People are counting on you to know your job, your truck, your tools and your training.

Posted in Jobs/Employment Post Date 05/25/2021


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